Latest recipes

Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds’ Wedding Desserts

Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds’ Wedding Desserts


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The food-loving couple pulled out all the stops for their Sept. 8 wedding

The details just keep rolling in. If you’ve been living under a rock, here's a quick catch-up for you: Gossip Girl actress Blake Lively and actor Ryan Reynolds tied the knot last week in a super-secret ceremony in Charleston, S.C.

The specifics of their big day were few and far between up until this point, but now we're learning a little bit more. Though we know the location and their attire, the details on the food have been minimal thus far — but boy, did they eat.

The menu from Charleston restaurant FIG is still under wraps, but the word is out on dessert:

According to People, the couple had a tiered, cream-hued wedding cake with peach accents made by Virginia-based cake designer Maggie Austin Cake.

New York City coffeehouse, Bakehouse, made chocolate ganache-filled mini bundt cakes and a s’mores bar.

Charleston-based popsicle vendor King of Pops supplied the guests with gourmet cold treats, and the sticks had sayings like "Suck it" and "Ain’t love sweet?" printed on them.


Ryan Reynolds Offers Insight Into His Life With Baby Betty, His 'Favorite' Person to Hang Out With

Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively have kept a lot about their youngest daughter Betty's life secret, from her official birth date to her full name. But Reynolds spoke a little about Betty during an interview with Entertainment Tonight. ET reporter Matt Cohen's son Mack asked Reynolds who his favorite person to hang out with from his pack is (since Reynolds is promoting his project The Croods: A New Age).

"I have a new baby. She's a little over a year now, so I really like hanging out with her, &lsquocause it's fun watching her grow up," he replied.

Mack took the opportunity to ask Reynolds if he and Lively would like any more kids. &ldquoDo you like the size of your pack in real life? Or do you wanna grow it bigger?&rdquo Mack asked.

Reynolds was kind enough to reply, &ldquoBoy, I think it's a pretty good size right now. I think it's a pretty good size right now, although I appreciate the bait, Mack!"

Reynolds and Lively have two other daughters, James, 6, and Inez, 4. Reynolds shared the first and only photo of Betty last October. He put an emoji over her face, of course, to preserve her privacy.

I love B.C. 🇨🇦 I want my daughters to experience the same natural playground I grew up in. On Oct. 21, the candidate you vote for will SHAPE CLIMATE POLICY. I&rsquom proud of the climate progress made the last 4 years. Click https://t.co/gJ8wvRwD2y for voting info. #Capilano pic.twitter.com/a3itOeIqQx

&mdash Ryan Reynolds (@VancityReynolds) October 17, 2019

Lively spoke to Marie Claire in 2016 about how important keeping their children out of photos is to the couple. "I'd rather not have to deal with it [the paparazzi] at all, but we knew the lifestyle we were getting into, and while it's hard&hellipit's another thing when it's our child. She [James] didn't have the opportunity to make a decision about what she wants," Lively said.

"We want our kids to have the same normal life that we had," Lively added. "We don't ever want to rob them of what we had, because we'd feel really selfish."


Ryan Reynolds says his and Blake Lively’s wedding at former slave plantation was ‘a giant f***ing mistake’

AFTER almost eight years of marriage, Ryan Reynolds has revealed it was "a big f**king mistake" to have had his wedding with wife Blake Lively at former slave plantation in South Carolina.

The ceremony took place at Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina on September 9, 2012.

While speaking with Fast Company, the 43-year-old actor, who met Blake in 2010 on the set of Green Lantern, called it a “giant f***ing mistake” to have their nuptials there.

Ryan added: "It's something we'll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for.

”It's impossible to reconcile. What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy.”

The famous couple, who share three daughters, “got married again” at their home a few years later, but Ryan still feels “shame” about their first one.

After realizing what a mistake it all was, he decided to not let it shut him down but instead let it “reframe things and move [him] into action.”

The Aviation Gin owner continued: ”It doesn't mean you won't f*** up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn't end.”

Moving into action, as he said he wanted to do, Ryan and Blake gave a $200,000 donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund earlier this year and opened up about wanting to “educate” themselves further.

The Deadpool star and Gossip Girl alum wrote in a statement on Instagram: ”We've never had to worry about preparing our kids for different rules of law or what might happen if we're pulled over in the car.

”We don't know what it's like to experience that life day in and day out. We can't imagine feeling that kind of fear and anger.

“We're ashamed that in the past, we've allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is."

The pair continued: ”We want to educate ourselves about other people's experiences and talk to our kids about everything, all of it … especially our own complicity.

“We talk about our bias, blindness and our own mistakes.

“We look back and see so many mistakes which have led us to deeply examine who we are and who we want to become. They've led us to huge avenues of education.”


Why Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively's Wedding Was Controversial & They Regret It

Famous Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds, known for movies such as The Proposal and Deadpool, called his wedding with Blake Lively, “a big f—ing mistake.” According to the tweet, Reynolds deeply regrets the wedding that he had with Lively back in 2012.

Just as a refresher, Lively and Reynolds had a wedding at Boone Hall, a plantation in South Carolina. The website states that the site is “one of America’s oldest working plantations.”

Reynolds was criticized for his hypocrisy in 2018 when he praised the movie, Black Panther, which starred the late Chadwick Boseman, due to his and Lively’s choice in wedding venue back in 2012.

The wedding, as others had noted on Twitter, featured brick slave quarters and cotton fields among their modern wedding tables and chairs. The plantation was built on slavery and on the hard-working, unpaid and mistreated slaves, as E! News states.

“It’s something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for. It’s impossible to reconcile,” Reynolds stated in a tweet. “What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy.”

Blake and Reynolds have apologized for their wedding venue and have even stated that they got married again, this time at home. Reynolds reported that he still felt shameful for the plantation wedding.

“A giant f—king mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action. It doesn’t mean you won’t f— up again. But re-patterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end.”

According to E, “After meeting on the set of The Green Lantern in 2010 (while Lively was still dating Gossip Girl partner Penn Badgley and he was in the waning months of his marriage to Scarlett Johansson), it took them more than a year and a half of friendship—and one very telling double-date—to realize they were destined for more.”

“About a year after Green Lantern had come and gone and all that stuff, we were both single,” he recalled during a 2016 appearance on Entertainment Weekly‘s SiriusXM show. “We went on a double date. She was on a date with another guy and I was on a date with another girl. That was the most awkward date for the respective parties because we were just fireworks coming across.”

Before they marked their first anniversary, Reynolds presented her with an estimated 12-carat oval-cut Lorraine Schwartz engagement ring.

Charmed by the stately manor and pictures of sun streaming through the Spanish moss, they quietly put together an evening for 35 guests at Boone Hall Plantation, just eight miles from downtown Charleston, before anyone even realized they were betrothed.


10 They Are Fully Committed To the Family They Built Together

They are the ultimate working parents, two movie stars with crazy shooting schedules in often far-flung locations. However, Blake and Ryan have expressed many times how committed they are to their daughters and on spending time together as a family.

"My husband and I don’t work at the same time, so we all go together as a family. If we’re away as a family, it’s never more than for a day. We stay together," Blake told People in 2017.


Ryan Reynolds apologizes for marrying Blake Lively in plantation wedding

Ryan Reynolds is apologizing for marrying Blake Lively on a plantation.

Reynolds, 43, and Lively, 32, exchanged vows in 2012 at Boone Hall Plantation in South Carolina, but they later regretted not giving the site's "devastating" history more thought, Reynolds told Fast Company in a new interview. The plantation features nine slave cabins.

"It’s something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for," said the "Deadpool" star.

"It’s impossible to reconcile. What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy," he added.

The Canadian-born actor said the "shame" he and Lively later felt about the setting motivated them to educate themselves about racism.

"A giant f------ mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action. It doesn’t mean you won’t f--- up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end," he said.

Reynolds and Lively — who share daughters James, 5, Inez, 3, and a child reportedly named Betty, whom they welcomed last year — donated $1 million to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights last year.

In late May, the couple announced they'd donated another $200,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody days before. In a joint statement on Instagram, the pair said they were "ashamed" that they'd been uninformed in the past about the evils of systemic racism in the U.S., but vowed to continue educating themselves on the topic.

The couple wrote that they wanted to "use our privilege and platform to be an ally. And to play a part in easing pain for so many who feel as though this grand experiment is failing them."

Reynolds recently announced he was launching a new program called the Group Effort Initiative to hire trainees who are "Black, Indigenous, people of color or people from marginalized or excluded communities" to work on his next film.

"Making a movie, well, it's a group effort. But for entirely too long, that group has systemically excluded Black, Indigenous, people of color and a whole host of otherwise marginalized communities," Reynolds shared in a video on Instagram.

The actor said he was committed "to bringing between 10 and 20 trainees from the BIPOC community and any and all other marginalized communities of all ages" to the movie's set. (BIPOC is a term referring to Black people, Indigenous people and people of color. It has gained popularity during the recent rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.)

In his caption, Reynolds wrote that the Group Effort Initiative was "designed to invest in the talent and creativity of any and all under-represented communities who’ve felt this industry didn’t have room for their dreams."


Original Story 05/12/19: Blake Lively And Ryan Reynolds's Wedding Shadow Banned On Pinterest Because Of Location

Pinterest is a bride and groom&rsquos go-to website for wedding-planning inspiration.

From &lsquonaked&rsquo tiered cakes, peony floral arrangements and fairy lights, through to Great Gatsby-inspired décor and candle-filled barn locations, the platform has become a digital &lsquobible&rsquo of the dos and don&rsquots for a nuptials.

However, one wedding that will no longer feature on Pinterest is that of Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds.

In September 2012, the pair married at the Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina &ndash where scenes for The Notebook were filmed - in front of friends and family including actress Alexis Bledel and singer Florence Welch. While photos from the couple&rsquos big day were never released, the bride is rumoured to have worn a Marchesa &lsquocloud-like&rsquo dress and organised a 'dessert table' at the reception.


A Look At Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds' Deeply Controversial Wedding

A nearly mile-long tunnel of weathered 270-year-old oak trees, dripping with Spanish moss. A reception venue filled with charming details, from the bistro light-strung patio overlooking the tidal marsh to the angled wooden beams just begging for chandeliers to the antique table covered in various homespun desserts.

Add to that a custom couture silk tulle Marchesa ballgown with illusion crystal beading, a look befitting a bride who'd earned praise for the bohemian ensembles and statement footwear she'd popularized onscreen and the classic Chanel and dreamy Dior designs she'd famously selected for various red carpets and press appearances without the help of a stylist.

But there's a reason Ryan Reynolds recently called his Sept. 9, 2012 wedding to Blake Lively "a giant f--king mistake."

When the couple first happened onto images of South Carolina's Boone Hall Plantation & Gardens, mere months into their friends-to-lovers transition, they saw the dream of exchanging vows under the curved oaks the potential in the rustic, wooden Cotton Dock the seemingly endless picturing-taking possibilities the romance. The place had been a backdrop for the tearjerker to end all tearjerkers, The Notebook for Chrissake!

But eight years removed from the whirlwind of wedding planning, they were able to see what others had noted: The crumbling brick slave quarters. The fields of cotton. The decades of violence and horrific abuses against Africans stolen from their homes that had taken place on the sprawling bucolic grounds as families built their fortune on the backs of unpaid, mistreated slaves.

They fully understood the reason sites like The Knot and Pinterest had responded to civil rights group Color of Change's call to stop featuring plantation wedding venues that serve as "physical reminders of one of the most horrific human rights abuses the world has ever seen."

Their hindsight 20/20, "It's something we'll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for," Reynolds addressed in Fast Company's September 2020 issue. "It's impossible to reconcile. What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy."

Perhaps not the image they had in mind for the highlight of their rom-com worthy love story.

Good buddies after meeting on the set of The Green Lantern in 2010 (while Lively was still dating Gossip Girl partner Penn Badgley and he was in the waning months of his marriage to Scarlett Johansson), it took them more than a year and a half of friendship&mdashand one very telling double-date&mdashto realize they were destined for more.

"About a year after Green Lantern had come and gone and all that stuff, we were both single," he recalled during a 2016 appearance on Entertainment Weekly's SiriusXM show. "We went on a double date. She was on a date with another guy and I was on a date with another girl. That was the most awkward date for the respective parties because we were just fireworks coming across."

Their forever was sealed after one chemistry-laden 2011 night out in New York City's Tribeca neighborhood. "This song came on and I was just like, 'Want to dance?'" he detailed to GQ in 2016. "No one was in there, so it was just totally empty. And it was just one of those moments where halfway through the dance, it was like, 'Oh, I think I just crossed a line.'"

And before they marked their first anniversary, Reynolds presented her with an estimated 12-carat oval-cut Lorraine Schwartz engagement ring.

Charmed by the stately manor and pictures of sun streaming through the Spanish moss, they quietly put together an evening for 35 guests at Boone Hall Plantation, just eight miles from downtown Charleston, before anyone even realized they were betrothed.

A setting ripped from Allie and Noah's love story and a one-of-a-kind couture ballgown, it was the level of grandiose the style-minded star envisioned when talking with Marie Claire just months earlier.

"Every girl has her dream," she allowed in her July 2012 chat with then-creative director Nina Garcia. "But what I planned before I got into the business has changed. It used to be that my mom or I would make my dress. Now I'm like, 'Hmm, I wonder what shoes Christian [Louboutin] is going to make me. And which couture house should I go to?'"

And, indeed, the famed stiletto designer and a pair of his red-soled beauties were on hand that September weekend in 2012 along with Lively's good friend Florence Welch, who'd been tapped to provide a bit of evening entertainment. But the rest of the details were, by the bride's own account, somewhat of a mess when she placed a call to Martha Stewart, her neighbor in Bedford, N.Y., the charming country town she and Reynolds had chosen to start their shared future.

"Our wedding was becoming a disaster, and we didn't know what to do, so we called Martha!" Lively recalled to Vogue in 2014. "She said, 'Don't worry. I'll handle it.' She sent her team down to save us."

Dispatched to South Carolina, the domestic doyenne's crew worked their magic. Desserts hand-picked from Charleston's top bakeries&mdash s'mores bars from Bakehouse Charleston, blueberry cheesecake tartlets and mini strawberry shortcakes from Caviar & Bananas&mdashwere stacked onto trays, cake plates and in baskets, just as baking enthusiast Lively had hoped. A four-tiered vanilla-and-sour cream cake with peach-apricot preserves from Virginia's Maggie Austin Cake stood tall amongst the confections and glass domes filled with blush garden roses.

Hexagonal terrariums, bird cages and display cabinets were arranged to feature trinkets and blooms from Ooh! Events, highlighting the venue's vintage style. Pine needles were strewn down the aisle, offset by seating purchased from Aidan Gray where the guests would watch Lively walk toward her groom as a children's choir sang Frankie Valli's "Can't Take My Eyes Off of You." Parasols selected from Paper Lantern Store were set out to shield attendees from the late summer sun. And, later in the evening, sparklers were dispersed, lit up to add to the excitement of Welch's performance.

The finishing touch: a bouquet of pink jasmine, andromeda and dusty miller, Martha Stewart Weddings' style director Kate Berry carefully dipping select petals in rose gold glitter chosen to reflect the embroidery on Lively's Marchesa gown. The actress, a source told Us Weekly at the time, was a "creative bride with a clear vision of what she wanted."

Not part of her fantasy: memories of bloodshed and abuse.

Caught up in the weeds of tablescapes and menus, neither she nor Reynolds stopped to consider what it meant to actually wed at a plantation, the pretty backdrop not quite covering up the atrocities committed. But as they did, the shame set in, crystalizing further when Reynolds' well-meaning tweet congratulating 2018's Black Panther, the first blockbuster featuring a Black superhero, was met with derision as Twitter users accused him of hypocrisy.

"Shame works in weird ways," Reynolds reflected to Fast Company. "A giant f--king mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action. It doesn't mean you won't f--k up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn't end."

For the couple, that meant marrying again at home "years ago," he told the mag. But, more importantly, not just acknowledging their mistake, but pledging to do better moving forward.

They've gifted $1 million a piece to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights and created the Group Effort Initiative through Reynolds' Maxium Effort production company, a plan to bring a minimum of 10 trainees "who are Black, Indigenous, people of color or people from marginalized and excluded communities," the website states. Participants will be paid out of his salary "and will spend their days on set learning from professionals and getting real-life experience that they can then parlay into another job and another job and hopefully a career in the film industry."

As Reynolds noted to Fast Company, "Representation and diversity need to be completely immersive. Like, it needs to be embedded at the root of storytelling, and that's in both marketing and Hollywood. When you add perspective and insight that isn't your own, you grow."

He and Lively hope their personal growth is just beginning.

Following the horrific killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor this spring, they pledged an additional $200,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, issuing a promise via Instagram to "stay educated and vote in every election. We want to know the positions of school board nominees, sheriffs, mayors, councilpersons. We want to know their positions on justice."

They intend to "use our privilege and platform to be an ally," they shared, and teach their children about the importance of dismantling systemic racism. "We want to educate ourselves about other people's experiences and talk to our kids about everything, all of it. especially our own complicity," they summed up. "We talk about our bias, blindness and our own mistakes. We look back and see so many mistakes which have led us to deeply examine who we are and who we want to become. They've led us to huge avenues of education."

Demi Lovato says ɼompassion' is key when helping an addict: Tough love 'made me act out more'

Game Changers: Lou Diamond Phillips on how 'La Bamba' 'proved that a Latinx-centric story could be a box-office success'

Prince William and Prince Harry react to ⟺ilings' behind Princess Diana's infamous 1995 BBC interview

Hugh Grant reveals Drew Barrymore sent him a letter of support after 1995 arrest — before they even met

Bette Midler announces that 'Hocus Pocus 2' is happening: 'We're back!'

Hailey Baldwin Defends Her Love of Wearing Sneakers with Bikinis: 'That's My Vibe'

The model, and face of Levi's new 501 Originals campaign, doesn't understand why some people think it's weird to wear sneakers with a swimsuit

The Surprising Reason Why Princess Beatrice's Baby Will Receive a Royal Title

She’s just ninth in line for the British throne, but Princess Beatrice, who recently announced she and husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi are expecting, will still get a title for her fall arrival.

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

The #1 Thing Women Should Never Do if They Want To Prevent Dementia, According to Science

Keep your brain sharp by steering clear of this dangerous habit.

Florida divers encounter colossal, ‘abnormally round’ bull shark

A Florida freediving guide has captured images showing a bull shark so massive and “abnormally round” that it dwarfed other sharks and divers brave enough to swim in its company.

Queen Elizabeth Is Reportedly ‘Unimpressed’ With Prince Harry After His Latest Interview

He compared growing up in the royal family to “living in a zoo.”

Khloé Kardashian's Good American Swimwear Helped Her Feel ɼomfortable' Rocking Bikinis

Khloé Kardashian's Good American label is launching new swimwear styles, made from an innovative, size-adjusting material that shifts with normal weight fluctuation

I worked at Disney World for 2 years. Here are 10 things I wish tourists would stop wasting money on.

Visiting Disney World isn't cheap, but added costs like parking and fancy resorts aren't necessary, according to a former employee and avid fan.

Prince William’s Vaccine Photo Has Royal Fans Hot, Bothered & Congratulating Kate Middleton

It’s getting hot in here, so roll up all your sleeves! Well, Prince William already has, and for that we — and Twitter — are grateful. The Duke of Cambridge received his first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine on Thursday, May 20, sharing a snapshot of the momentous occasion to the official Duke and Duchess […]

Ex-DOJ Official Warns Trump: 'This Is A Letter Talking About Jail Time'

Former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal says the former president as well as his two adult sons are facing a serious legal threat.

Warriors' Steph Curry named NBA MVP finalist this season

Steph Curry, Nikola Jokic and Joel Embiid are finalists for this year's NBA MVP.

A "Highly Placed Source" Claims Princess Beatrice's Pregnancy Reveal Was a "Total Dig" at the Sussexes

After 20 years of insults, Kwame Brown proved revenge is best served flaming hot

The former No 1 overall pick in the NBA draft has been ridiculed for years as a bust. This week, in hours of YouTube rants, he set the record straight Kwame Brown talks to Kobe Bryant during his time with the Lakers in 2006. Photograph: Andrew D Bernstein/NBAE/Getty Images Before the NFL’s JaMarcus Russell there was the NBA’s Kwame Brown. Like the former Raiders quarterback, Brown was a top draft pick whose bevy of physical gifts marked him as the kind of transformational player who only comes along once in a generation. But unlike Russell, who was a star in college with LSU first, Brown had that burden placed upon him while still a teenager. Brown made history as the first NBA player to go No 1 straight out of high school when Michael Jordan’s Washington Wizards came calling in 2001. And if he didn’t go down as a Hall of Fame-bound great in the mold of other straight-from-school players like Kobe Bryant or Kevin Garnett, well, Brown figured to be at least as brilliant as Jermaine O’Neal or fellow McDonald’s All-American Tyson Chandler. When Brown turned out to be neither of those things, he became easy fodder for “all-time draft busts” clickbait, inspiration for this ur-Stephen A Smith rant, an argument for bringing back the NBA age limit and a punchline for a thousand basketball podcasts – even player-hosted safe-spaces like Showtime’s All The Smoke. In a recent episode reformed NBA tough guys Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson sat down with Gilbert Arenas, the clownish Steph Curry antecedent turned podcast host. When asked about his time with the Washington Wizards, Arenas circled back to his four seasons with Brown. And as much as he tried to tout Brown as a potential best-ever No 1 who had the misfortune of starting his career on the same team Jordan chose to end his, Arenas couldn’t resist calling Brown a “man child” and “show pony” while rubbing in how he seized primacy on the Wizards in a final blow to Brown’s confidence. All the while, Barnes and Jackson snickered along. But Brown, in a welcome twist, wasn’t having it. Puffing a hookah from his home with action figures in his likeness and a key to some city in the background, Brown took to YouTube and unloaded on the trio for more than an hour. Throughout, the 39-year-old effectively labeled Jackson a fake gangster turned fake social justice warrior, Barnes a tragic mulatto and Arenas an Uncle Tom who perpetuated the bust narrative by being a lousy teammate on the Wizards. Brown further recommended the podcast try discussing bigger problems instead of rehashing his career. So of course Barnes and Jackson doubled down. On ESPN’s The Jump, Barnes feigned surprise. “I get where he’s coming from,” he said. “He’s kind of been the butt of jokes coming into the league and not being able to live up to that No 1 potential. If you want to be mad at anyone, be mad at MJ for picking you No 1.” On Instagram, Jackson was unrepentant. “Your whole career was dirt, your whole life is dirt and it ain’t my job to pour more dirt on you,” he said, wishing him “nothing but success” nevertheless. At the time of writing Brown’s responses to their responses had elapsed more than four hours and effectively seem to say, “if you can’t take the heat, don’t name your podcast All The Smoke.” It’s enough to make you wonder: Where has this guy been all along? Even after bursting onto the scene out of Glynn Academy in Georgia, Brown would remain wary of a basketball media that still feasts on all things Jordan – and rightfully so. We savored Jordan dismissing Brown’s hands as too small for his 7ft frame and we made a meal out of him allegedly reducing Brown to tears in a practice – and all while we gently set aside the part about Jordan’s reported use of homophobic slurs like pin bones in a salmon filet. Brown did attempt to correct the record while working as an analyst on SI.com’s coverage of the 2017 draft, saying, “Michael never brought me to tears.” But the rejoinder came too late and was hardly loud enough to cut through noisy and gleeful critics like Skip Bayless and Stephen A Smith – whom Brown, fed up with 20 years of disrespect, has challenged to “mutual combat.” The internet, however, has evened the playing field and Brown, at last, is happy to turn up the volume. When he wasn’t hitting back at his established and arriviste media critics, he was untangling interesting ideas like the impact of LeBron James’s activism on less celebrated players (“imagine the guy who’s on a 10-day contract who needs every bit of this money … not agreeing with LeBron …”) or relating the difficulties of navigating healthcare after the end of an NBA career – a salient point that was lost in the crossfire between him, Barnes, Jackson and Arenas. Again: Where has this guy been all along? And what is it about him that makes for such a convenient punching bag? After all, it’s hard to say Brown was a complete bust. JaMarcus Russell ate his way through the NFL and was out of a job after three years. Brown hung around the NBA for 13 seasons. He started nearly half of his 625 career games and averaged 22 minutes during the regular season. He was traded three times and grossed more than $63m in career earnings. For a kid who was the product of a broken family, who overcame homelessness, who subsisted on free lunch programs, who wore hand-me-down clothes, who couldn’t afford shoes big enough for his feet, and who hailed from a town that has gained infamy as the site of Ahmaud Arbery’s murder, Brown looks more like a great American success story than another caption entry for the all-time bust slideshow. (You can’t tell Brown his life isn’t gonna be a movie someday…) Not even Lenny Cooke – the phenom who at one point was the highest-rated prospect in a high school cohort that included James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and Amar’e Stoudemire – has to suffer smirking hoops heads rehashing his Icarus-like fall. Where Cooke is seen as a sympathetic figure, Brown draws nothing but ire. Perhaps things would have been different if, like Cooke, he hadn’t made the NBA at all. Take the No 1 pick out of the equation, and Brown’s an upgrade over the vast majority of tall and stiff forward-centers who came before him. He can’t help it if the Wizards liked him more than Tyson Chandler (second overall), Pau Gasol (third) or Tony Parker (28th). What’s more, it wasn’t as if Brown was on some post-playing quest to rewrite the warped popular narrative about him. He was minding his own business when Barnes and Jackson came for him. Now, I’m not telling you anything Brown doesn’t say himself. And not all of his counterattacks were in bounds. In addition to the n-bombs and other explosive insults, his meandering rants don’t hold back on expletives or casual misogyny. But if you can stomach that, you’re gonna love when he takes partial credit for Kobe’s 81-point game in 2006. Brown, a more than serviceable “dirty work” player, firmly believes Kobe would not have been able to post those numbers if Brown wasn’t his teammate setting hard screens. Player beefs in the media are a dime a dozen Barnes, Jackson and Arenas – instigators to the end – are perennial all-stars when it comes to stirring the pot. But credit where due: Brown was the sleeping giant who should’ve been roused a long time ago. And now that he finally has our undivided attention, let’s hope another 20 years don’t pass before this Brobdingnagian teller of truths so much as thinks about going silent again.

It looks like we finally know Marvel’s next major villain who will replace Thanos

Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but Marvel’s next Disney+ MCU TV show is rumored to feature at least one massive cameo. That should be par for the course for any Marvel movie or TV series. The only way to tie these projects together is to have some cameos and Easter eggs in each …

CJ McCollum calls LeBron James ‘actor of the year’ for overselling foul

The Trail Blazers guard isn't buying what LeBron James was selling in the Lakers-Warriors play-in tournament game.


Ryan Reynolds says he and Blake Lively are 'unreservedly sorry' for plantation wedding

Hugh Jackman and Ryan Reynolds call a truce to donate to the "All-In-Challenge." But Jackman tells USA TODAY that the "feud" is far from over. USA TODAY

Ryan Reynolds is speaking up about his 2012 wedding with Blake Lively, which has been criticized for taking place on a South Carolina plantation due to its connection to slavery.

In an interview with Fast Company Tuesday, the actor, 43, said the wedding is "something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for."

“It’s impossible to reconcile. What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy," he said. "Years ago we got married again at home – but shame works in weird ways."

He continued, "A giant (expletive) mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action. It doesn’t mean you won’t (expletive) up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end."

The secret September wedding eight years ago, which was planned and executed with the help of Martha Stewart's design team, took place outside of Charleston at Boone Plantation. The intimate event included performances by Florence Welch and was attended by 35 guests.

According to the plantation's website, there are nine historic slave cabins on the property where people can learn "how Black Americans worked and lived" as well as the "struggles that were faced."

People have shared criticism over the choice of venue on social media for years.

Last year, user @oureric called it out by tweeting, "Happy Juneteenth to Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds’ wedding venue!"

"every time I see ryan reynolds and blake lively I remember they got married on a slave plantation," user @CHRlSTITTIES tweeted with an image in 2017.

every time I see ryan reynolds and blake lively I remember they got married on a slave plantation pic.twitter.com/EE64cXE12R

— roni (@CHRlSTITTIES) October 24, 2017

"Never forgot that Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds got married on a plantation. Never underestimate white people’s ability to white," user @anthoknees tweeted in 2019.

In May, Lively and Reynolds took to Instagram to announce they donated $200,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

"We're ashamed that in the past we've allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is," they wrote in their announcement.

The couple added that they're committed to raising their children to not inflict pain on others either "consciously or unconsciously."

"We've been teaching our children differently than the way our parents taught us," they wrote. "We want to educate ourselves about other people's experiences and talk to our kids about everything, all of it. especially our own complicity."

More recently, Reynolds launched a self-funded diversity and inclusion program in July called The Group Effort Initiative, which aims to give people from marginalized communities the opportunity to work on and learn from his productions.

In a video announcement, he explained the 10 to 20 trainees will include BIPOC as well as people from other marginalized communities across the age spectrum.

"All ages?! Yes!" he says in the video. "Because it's never too late."

He added, "These new recruits are going to be paid and housed and traveled out of my salary. They're going to spend their days on set learning from professionals, getting real life experience that they can then parlay into another job and then hopefully – if they're not too disillusioned – a career in the film industry."

Contributing: Bryan Alexander and Ann Oldenburg, USA TODAY

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries:

1 of 37 2 of 37 3 of 37 4 of 37 5 of 37 6 of 37 7 of 37 8 of 37 9 of 37 10 of 37 11 of 37 12 of 37 13 of 37 14 of 37 15 of 37 16 of 37 17 of 37 18 of 37 19 of 37 20 of 37 21 of 37 22 of 37 23 of 37 24 of 37 25 of 37 26 of 37 27 of 37 28 of 37 29 of 37 30 of 37 31 of 37 32 of 37 33 of 37 34 of 37 35 of 37 36 of 37 37 of 37

Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds Finally Apologize For Their Plantation Wedding

Over the years, even some of the most ardent fans of Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds have had to wrestle with a difficult question: Why, when the couple got married in 2012, did they choose to do so on the grounds of a place inextricably linked to slavery, to the point that its website boasts it was once named the “#1 Plantation in the Charleston Area” by USA Today?

Eight years later, Reynolds finally has an answer: They saw the venue on Pinterest. And according to a new interview with the actor, they’ve regretted that moment ever since.

“It’s something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for,” Reynolds told Fast Company. “It’s impossible to reconcile. What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy.”

Eventually, Reynolds noted, he and Lively remarried at a place that wasn’t Boone Hall Plantation, which is home to nine original “slave cabins.” (Boone Hall is one of the oldest working plantations in America, dating back to the late 17th century.) “But shame works in weird ways,” Reynolds said. “A giant fucking mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action. It doesn’t mean you won’t fuck up again. But re-patterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end.”

The interview marks the first time either Reynolds or Lively have addressed the wedding publicly, though they did acknowledge they’ve made “many mistakes” in a general apology in late May. “We’re ashamed that in the past we’ve allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is,” the couple wrote in a statement. “We want to educate ourselves about other people’s experiences and talk to our kids about everything, all of it… especially our own complicity.”

Meanwhile, Boone Hall has also recently made a form of “reparations.” In a video slideshow featuring figures like President Barack Obama and Martin Luther King, Jr., it announced the rebranding of its nine original slave cabins as “Black History in America,” an exhibit “included with admission to plantation.”



Comments:

  1. Sale

    Wacker, what a phrase ... the excellent thought

  2. Kasper

    What very good question

  3. Elric

    You are wrong. I can prove it.

  4. Tukinos

    Nice post! I drew up a lot of new and interesting things for myself!

  5. Zulkihn

    You are wrong. Let's discuss. Email me at PM, we'll talk.



Write a message